Disinformation, Influence Ops and the Humble Blog

Just a few days ago, Wired Magazine published an article revealing that the ongoing Russian disinformation campaign also involved a number of long form blog posts published on Medium.

In this post, I want to talk about why this seemingly new move from Russian info ops is actually not surprising at all and makes perfect logical sense in an overall content strategy. Blogs play a key role in an effective strategy, with content posted on Twitter, Facebook and other social platforms acting as ‘outposts’, all emanating from the blog, which is placed at the heart.

Some of the Medium bloggers had tens of thousands of followers. They published content around predictable topics such as ‘race, science and politics, indoctrination on US college campuses’ – and that good old chestnut, ‘lies from Hillary Clinton’. The fake blogger identities were carefully crafted to appeal to their target audience, with bios claiming to be conservative, Christian, and family-oriented.

This approach reflects that used on Twitter by many bot and sock puppet accounts; designed to instil a sense of community between the fake accounts and their Trump-supporting human target audiences. It’s an attempt to create an in-group, define its identity in opposition to the ‘out-group’ and build trust between its members. This makes the messages seem more believable in the target audience’s minds.

The most famous and prolific disinformation blogger of all is ‘Jenna Abrams’, the Kremlin operated account that fooled Americans for a number of years. From 2014 onwards, the ‘freewheeling American blogger’ who just happened to push a return to segregation and decried ‘PC culture run amok’ had plenty of time to build a significant target audience. The account was perfectly placed to propel divisive messages into the mainstream media, becoming an influential voice just in time for Trump’s election in 2016.

How did this fake identity become so influential? Firstly, ‘Abrams’ touted a lot of controversial opinions. Pushing openly xenophobic and racist opinions riled up a lot of journalists and celebrities on social media, which helped to boost Abram’s messages and help them gain more traction and visibility. Many of her tweets and posts went viral. When something goes viral it’s quite common for it to reach the attention of the mainstream media, and this is what happened with Abrams. The Abrams account was featured in many of the biggest media outlets and this in turn fed back into her following, attracting more people to view, share and comment on her content.

Conventional marketing wisdom has always claimed blogging as a highly effective way to build a personal or professional brand. During its early days, a whole host of blogging gurus and advice sites sprung up, such as Problogger, Neil Patel and Chris Brogan. They taught people how to harness the power of online content to define their brand and attract better professional opportunities. Indeed, many Internet celebrities such as Tim Ferriss, Gala Darling and Ash Ambirge of the Middle Finger Project came into existence thanks to the power of blogging.

I did it myself; spending around four years building up a professional identity in the field of nation brand strategy, by creating content about the topic and publishing it online. This, combined with a lot of social media outreach and networking, plus a bit of well-placed SEO, brought me a modest range of opportunities. They ranged from an invitation to keynote at an international conference, to an interview with CNN and a number of consulting opportunities based on my supposed expertise. This expertise was solely built through blogging.

My nation branding blog wasn’t pushing disinformation. But nevertheless it’s another case in point that shows just how easy it is to build a believable personal brand and gain an audience purely through online content creation. With this in mind, it doesn’t surprise me in the least that Russia’s expert info ops strategists are using blogging as part of their disinformation campaigns. I’d wager we can expect others like these in the future.

What’s more, the line between a personal blog and a professional news source has become blurred. Anyone can set up a website and promote their own content to the world. If it attracts enough viewers and enough engagement, then the site will start to gain value and become a trusted source. With enough traction, a simple blog might even turn into something like Breitbart, with the influence to significantly affect public opinion and bring toxic debates into the mainstream.

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