Category: Brexit

Tribalism in the time of coronavirus

As I write this, the world has descended into a major crisis, with effects more far-reaching than anything I’ve experienced in my lifetime. A powerful virus has swept onto the scene and is now ripping its way through the world. Barely any country has been spared.

Here in the UK, the coronavirus crisis is getting worse by the day. But merely observing the city streets on this sunny spring Sunday would give no indication of the gravity of the situation. Indeed, some UK tourist spots, notably Snowdon, experienced their ‘busiest day in living memory’. That’s quite something at a time when a highly contagious virus is on the loose.

In contrast, the streets of Paris, Lisbon and Barcelona are deserted. Most EU countries have issued a decisive response, putting their populations under strict lockdown to try and curb the spread of the virus. The UK government hasn’t followed suit.

Britain is lumbered with the worst possible leadership in a time of such crisis. There have already been many deaths. Amid the frenzied warnings from other countries, tribalism, rooted in the impulses that drove Brexit, still bisects British society — even influencing how we perceive the choice between life and health, or possible death. 

Brexit tribalism could be seen as a barometer for who will approve or disapprove of Boris Johnson’s handling of the coronavirus situation. No scientific study has yet been conducted to prove or disprove this, but research from Cambridge has shown that Leave (and Trump) voters have a strong tendency to believe conspiracy theories.

So if I may hypothesise for a moment, it would go as follows.

Those who believe Johnson is doing well and don’t believe in the necessity of self isolation — more likely to be Leave voters. Those who believe Johnson is doing the wrong thing and we should follow the majority of the EU (and the world) into lockdown — more likely to be Remain voters. 

I can’t help but wonder if these divided attitudes are linked to the government’s aggressively anti-EU narrative. Could it possibly be that our leaders are reluctant to implement lockdown because it would mean them falling into line with the EU? The British government can’t possibly be seen to do that. On the contrary, it must do the exact opposite. After all, there’s a voter base to keep happy.

This tribal stance has filtered down to the population. People’s cavalier real-life behaviour at a critical juncture risks the health and safety of us all.

We’ve gone beyond Brexit concerns now. Freedom of movement is no longer the most important thing at stake. Continued tribal attitudes in the UK could now lead to significant numbers of deaths. The reckoning has arrived. No matter what side of the political spectrum we’re on, we must ensure that tribalism does not cloud our actions on tackling the virus, as the New European so rightly points out.

There’s another factor influencing public opinion around coronavirus: online disinformation. It’s been a key part of turbocharging existing tribal divisions.

Based on my research so far, I’ve seen the following positions solidifying into recurring narratives. Many are from sources that originate in the United States, but the shared language and overlapping ideologies mean they can mostly be considered as UK-relevant too.  

Narratives primarily from conservative/right-wing/pro-Leave sources:

  • The coronavirus is a hoax used as a smokescreen for elites to take control of society
  • It’s no worse than the flu, so there’s no need to believe WHO or UN advice (in fact we shouldn’t trust them because they may be part of the elite conspiracy)
  • Social distancing is unnecessary / too extreme
  • China is to blame for all this. To quote Trump, coronavirus is ‘the Chinese virus’ 

Narratives primarily from liberal/left-wing/centrist/pro-Remain sources:

  • The coronavirus is real, serious, and affects everyone 
  • It can’t be compared to flu
  • We should trust advice from WHO/UN and other legitimate experts
  • Social distancing and possibly lockdown is necessary to save lives across the wider population. 

Most of the disinformation that I’ve observed so far plays on the core narrative strands in the first group. People targeted by these narratives might well be less likely to take the virus seriously and more likely to carry on with a semblance of normal life, thus continuing the pandemic. This unhelpful behaviour is exacerbated by the population spending more time at home and hence online, seeking out constant updates on this critical global threat.

In the next post, I will unravel the coronavirus disinformation narratives in more detail, providing data-driven examples. It’s critical to understand the why behind the seeding of this disinformation, so I’ll also discuss the various incentives that are driving it.

Behind the hashtag: Who’s tweeting about #SurrenderAct ?

If you’ve been following the latest news about Brexit, then you’ve probably heard about the so-called ‘Surrender Act’.

It’s Boris Johnson’s way of describing the Benn Act, passed by Parliament earlier this month to prevent No-Deal Brexit. This compels Johnson to seek an extension to Article 50 if he can’t reach a deal with the EU by October 19, 2019.

Johnson’s supporters didn’t approve of this legislation. They claimed that the Act would ‘undermine’ Britain’s negotiating power with the EU.

#SurrenderAct immediately started trending on Twitter. But who exactly was tweeting it? I jumped into the analytics to find out.

When did the hashtag start?

When analysing a hashtag, I usually begin by checking when it was first tweeted, and by whom. #SurrenderAct was first used by an account that really didn’t want to look like a bot…

Below we see a sharp spike in activity around the hashtag. It was tweeted over 3000 times over 12 hours (mainly during the UK night time).

So who else is tweeting about #SurrenderAct? Below are the top 10 most active hashtag users. In the rest of this post, I’ll put these accounts under the microscope.

Bot, cyborg, or organic human?

You’re probably wondering how many of these accounts are bots. Time for a quick reminder about what bots can (and can’t) do on Twitter. They’re pieces of code designed to amplify a particular hashtag, user or keyword. DFR Lab has a useful guide for spotting automated accounts.

The most obvious indicator of ‘bot-ness’ is high levels of activity, i.e. non-human tweeting patterns. Other top indicators are anonymity: e.g. no photo, or a generic one, a non-specific (usually political) bio, and a vague location, e.g. ‘England’, and amplification: only retweeting or liking other people’s tweets – i.e. boosting their messages in a quick and low-effort way.

Bots are less effective in human-to-human engagement, such as arguing with other Twitter users. That’s more likely to be human operators (or cyborgs, which mix bots with humans).

So, if boosting #SurrenderAct was the main purpose of these accounts, then we’d expect to find evidence of typical bot-like behaviours.

Let’s take a look at three interesting accounts within the top 10.

1. The Hyper-Prolific Tweeter

This account is new to Twitter, having joined in March this year. It has no photo (only the typical ‘egg’) and no bio. Definitely low effort.

But its rate of tweeting is impressive! During a short space of time, ‘christine’ has achieved a rate of over 1000 tweets per day.

Researchers cite a number of different benchmarks for identifying ‘bot-ness’. The Oxford Internet Institute says it’s an average of 50 tweets per day. DFR Lab is more generous. It claims that 72 tweets per day would be suspicious, and over 144 would be ‘highly suspicious’.

Remember too, that retweeting is faster and lower effort than creating replies or original tweets.

As shown above, ‘christine’ is going full bot. 100% of the account’s activity is retweets, all from the Twitter for iPhone app.

2. The Latent Islamophobe

‘Sue Reap’ is at number eight among those who most tweeted #SurrenderAct. There’s some interesting things going on with this account. Its bio is peppered with Tommy Robinson references and hashtags.

The account joined Twitter over seven years ago. But a couple of quick advanced searches shows that it didn’t tweet anything for most of 2012 or 2013.

Or, perhaps it did, but those tweets got deleted…It’s not easy to know.

Suddenly, ‘Susan’ springs into action in late 2013/early 2014 with a flurry of anti-Muslim tweets.

We can see that this account has a suspiciously high activity rate, producing 126.88 tweets per day, of which 22% is replies.

This rate puts the account close to the DFR Lab’s ‘highly suspicious’ bracket of 144 tweets per day.

So has ‘Susan’ given up on Tommy?

Not in the slightest. He’s still foremost in her mind, right up there with leaving the EU. It’s practically an obsession.

3. The ‘true-blue’ Brexiteer

This account is likely to be ‘organic’, i.e. a normal human user. It’s become quite Brexity in recent years, but still within the realms of normal human behaviour.

‘Pat’ was an early adopter of Twitter, joining in 2009, possibly when he/she was 55 (guessing from the handle). That would put them in their mid-60s now; the typical Brexit voter demographic.

At the beginning, ‘Pat’ tweeted everyday comments about garden parties and Michael Jackson. There was no sign of anything political.

In April 2016, when the referendum had been announced, ‘Pat’ was tweeting happily about normal things: celebrities, photography and TV shows.

But come May, as Britain inched closer to the date of the referendum, Pat’s political side suddenly became apparent. Out came the pro-Brexit tweets.

Despite this, the account is still within the realms of being normal. An activity rate of 33 tweets per day is nowhere near ‘botness’. What’s more, the 82% of replies shows that this account engages a lot with other users, rather than simply retweeting things blindly. This is not typical ‘bot’ behaviour.

It’s likely to be a typical older Brexit voter who has become somewhat radicalised by the debate’s tribal nature (it’s not just Brexit voters; but happens to both sides).

These accounts form just a tiny sample of the millions of accounts out there engaging with political content.

Key takeaway: Don’t just assume everyone is a bot; instead think critically before jumping to conclusions.

A tale of two PMs: Facebook, astroturfing, and social proof

There’s something odd about the Prime Minister’s Facebook page.

Underneath every post, especially those about Brexit, are hundreds of responses. This isn’t unusual for the page of a public figure, but the style of the responses didn’t ring true.

They are all very similar; short utterances of praise for Boris Johnson, repeating words and phrases such as ‘brilliant’, ‘fantastic’, and ‘support Boris 100%’. Each comment is festooned with Facebook’s emojis, mainly representing positive sentiments of ‘like’, ‘love’ and ‘laugh’.

This behaviour feels odd. I’m not denying that a lot of genuine people do support Johnson, but it’s suspicious for so many to consistently comment on his posts in this distinctive and repetitive fashion.

Screenshot of Boris Johnson’s Facebook page, with a selection of comments about Brexit.

Let’s contrast this with the page of his predecessor, Theresa May, specifically her Brexit-related posts. Here we see a very different scenario.

Responses to May’s posts tend to be a lot more varied, in content, tone and length. Some disagree with her. Others support her. But most are expressed in more depth and sophistication of language than the short repetitive replies on Johnson’s.

In short, the responses on May’s page look far more likely to be ‘organic’ (i.e. produced by real people behaving naturally) than the majority of those on Johnson’s. It’s possible that Johnson’s page is using artificial amplification techniques, which may include fake followers.

Screenshot of Theresa May’s Facebook page showing a sample of typical comments about Brexit. Note the contrast with Johnson’s page.

Facebook locks its data down tight, so it’s hard to run further analysis to determine for certain whether the Johnson supporters are part of an organised campaign.

But we can draw from previous examples. Donald Trump used fake Facebook followers during the US presidential campaign. Researchers discovered that over half of the followers on his page came from countries known as hubs for Facebook ‘like farms’.

These ‘farms’ are often found in developing nations such as the Philippines and India, where the dollar stretches a long way. They offer customers the opportunity to buy fake Facebook likes to create the impression of popular support.

As well as likes, customers can purchase fake engagement, usually in the form of comments. This may explain the unusual commenting activity on Johnson’s page.

For political purposes, this type of artificial campaign is an important tool, because it generates the illusion of grassroots support for a particular figure or issue. It even has a name: astroturfing.

Illusion becomes reality when the fake engagement intersects with genuine users, who are more likely to engage with seemingly popular posts thanks to the effect of ‘social proof’ – a psychological phenomenon where people tend to follow the actions of the masses.

This can be leveraged to great effect in social media environments, where user attention spans are low, knee-jerk reactions are prevalent, and ‘likes’ are an addictive form of currency.

Brexit influence campaign: #BritainIndependence

The atmosphere in Britain is becoming increasingly heated as October 31st inches ever closer. This is the date when the country will leave the European Union — if all goes to plan for Boris Johnson and the Conservative Party. Right now the political stakes are higher than ever.

Parliament has tried to protect the country from the potential catastrophe that may result from leaving without a deal. In the nick of time before prorogation, they passed a last-minute bill into law, designed to compel Johnson to seek an extension, if he can’t reach a suitable deal with the EU by the end of October.

Johnson has already lost multiple times in Parliament, despite his efforts to prorogue it for an unusually long time. Last week, a Scottish court ruled that this prorogation was unlawful. This week, the case goes to the English Supreme Court, where it will be challenged.

#BritainIndependence

In this highly-charged environment, Twitter has provided a constant source of lively political debate around Brexit. Many issues are bubbling up at present, some more relevant than others, but here I want to explore a particularly interesting hashtag.

#BritainIndependence has been popping up a lot lately. The first thing to do is to find out when it was first used, and who first used it. The hashtag came fairly late to the game, on September 9, via a user called ‘Trevor’, whose screen name is stuffed with pro-Brexit hashtags.

Signalling ingroup identity

A quick glance at Trevor’s bio is revealing. First, the bio is a strong indicator of self-professed identity on Twitter. In Trevor’s case, it contains words that reflect traditional values: conservative, nationalist, family-oriented, words such as ‘Christian’, ‘white’, ‘loyal British subject’, and ‘married’.

This creates a sense of group identity, designed to give Trevor’s profile immediate appeal to others who identify with similar values – i.e. signalling that he is part of an ingroup. In this case, the ingroup is pro-Brexit Twitter users.

The references to popular British football teams (Arsenal and Rangers), is likely designed to portray the account as belonging to a genuine working-class British citizen – another effort at signalling ingroup identity.

But the cultural references feel jumbled: Arsenal is an English team, while Rangers is a Scottish team. That plus the random mention of Northern Ireland means this bio doesn’t quite ring true. In fact, it feels like someone playing at being a Brit, perhaps for nefarious reasons.

What’s more, ‘neighbor’ is spelled in US English. No genuine speaker of British English would use US spelling; especially a man who seems so deeply committed to British patriotism. Clue, Trevor is likely not the grassroots British man that he pretends to be.

We could dig much deeper into Trevor’s account, especially his past tweet history. His account is devoted to tweeting about Brexit, even though it was created in September 2015, before Brexit existed. It would be interesting to see what Trevor was tweeting about between then and June 2016, but that’s a topic for another post…

Hashtag activity

Next up, let’s take a look at how Twitter users have been interacting with the #BritainIndependence hashtag, since ‘Trevor’ coined it on September 9th (coincidentally, just in time for the prorogation of Parliament).

All of the most retweeted tweets on the #BritainIndependence hashtag come from users with heavily pro-Brexit screen names (and usernames like @Brexit4me and @Feck_the_EU), suggesting one-topic accounts that exist simply for the purpose of engaging with Brexit-related discussions.

Retweets have two main functions, 1) they spread a message across Twitter, 2) they create validation for the message via social proof (i.e. if other people have engaged with this tweet, then it must be worth engaging with).

Liking (or favouriting) tweets reinforces the sense of social proof, while also increasing the likelihood of the tweet being seen in other users’ feeds.

The below tweets contain strong evidence of typical adversarial narratives, designed to promote a sense of tribalism, i.e. “us vs them”.

Examples include:

  • ‘Unelected judges’ and ‘hijacked by extremists’ (fits into narrative of the EU/Remain supporters being ‘anti-democratic’)
  • ‘Tattooed Eastern European thug’, and ‘brutal rape’ (fits into narrative of foreigners and ‘The Other’ as being threatening, especially to women)
  • ‘Me, just a patriot’ (supports the narrative of pro-Brexit voters as being especially patriotic. This is a similar notion to that conveyed by Trump’s ‘Make America Great Again (#MAGA’), which coincidentally appears in many of the user bios tweeting the #BritainIndependence hashtag.

Clearly, the #BritainIndependence hashtag exists to stoke further divides between the two sides in the Brexit debate, while creating the illusion of widespread support for the pro-Leave side. It’s highly likely that the hashtag was initialised for that very purpose, as the nature of ‘Trevor’s’ account suggests.

Furthermore, it’s telling that this hashtag coincides with several significant real-life events in the Brexit timeline that could threaten the pro-Brexit side, including the beginning of (unlawful) prorogation and the case going to the Supreme Court.

But why are so many of the top posting accounts so similar, with their bios stuffed with tribal keywords ? And why are so many of them blatantly US-centric, or with such obvious cultural errors (such as the spelling of ‘favorite’)?

This could indicate an organised social media manipulation campaign aiming to create the illusion of widespread support for the pro-Brexit side while deepening social and political divisions at a critical juncture for the country.

As October 31 inches closer, the discussion is certain to get even more heated – and we’re sure to see lots of interesting social media activity.

I’ll post further analyses here between now and October 31.